mypubliclands:

Happy Environmental Education Week!  
Throughout the week, we’ll share stories of employees and interns, volunteers and partners, who work in BLM STEM fields - that’s science, technology, engineering and math.  We’ll take a look at their work on the ground now and the education and experiences that led them to natural resources careers.
Today, we share Evolution of a Biologist by Tim Carrigan.  Tim is a wildlife biologist on the Renewable Energy Team in the BLM Idaho State Office.  He was also the assistant field manager of the Bruneau Field Office and a wildlife biologist in the Boise District.  Prior to serving in the Army from 1985 to 1990, Tim was a range conservationist in Salmon, Idaho.

"A photograph of a young boy staring eye-to-eye with a frog adorns the cover of Richard Louv’s 2005 bestseller ‘Last Child in the Woods.’  That boy could very well have been me 50 years ago in Minnesota where frogs were the most abundant and the easiest to catch wildlife.  My love of nature began there and continued as I moved to Contra Costa County in the San Francisco Bay area, an area unparalleled in America for richness and diversity of wildlife, especially herptiles, a group of animals made up of reptiles and amphibians.  It was these early encounters with animals and the outdoors that inspired me to study wildlife management in college and go on to become a wildlife biologist for the BLM."

Read Tim’s full story on the BLM’s history website.

mypubliclands:

Happy Environmental Education Week!  

Throughout the week, we’ll share stories of employees and interns, volunteers and partners, who work in BLM STEM fields - that’s science, technology, engineering and math.  We’ll take a look at their work on the ground now and the education and experiences that led them to natural resources careers.

Today, we share Evolution of a Biologist by Tim Carrigan.  Tim is a wildlife biologist on the Renewable Energy Team in the BLM Idaho State Office.  He was also the assistant field manager of the Bruneau Field Office and a wildlife biologist in the Boise District.  Prior to serving in the Army from 1985 to 1990, Tim was a range conservationist in Salmon, Idaho.

"A photograph of a young boy staring eye-to-eye with a frog adorns the cover of Richard Louv’s 2005 bestseller ‘Last Child in the Woods.’  That boy could very well have been me 50 years ago in Minnesota where frogs were the most abundant and the easiest to catch wildlife.  My love of nature began there and continued as I moved to Contra Costa County in the San Francisco Bay area, an area unparalleled in America for richness and diversity of wildlife, especially herptiles, a group of animals made up of reptiles and amphibians.  It was these early encounters with animals and the outdoors that inspired me to study wildlife management in college and go on to become a wildlife biologist for the BLM."

Read Tim’s full story on the BLM’s history website.

WEEKLY DEPARTMENT SEMINAR - (4/16/14)

The seminar for this Wednesday (tomorrow) is entitled:

Plume-induced tectono-magmatic crustal convection produced nova and corona structures on Venus

By: Taras Gerya, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland

Wednesday, April 16, 2014 from 4:00-5:20pm

110 Willamette Hall

Don’t forget to enjoy some tea and cookies before the seminar from 3:30-4:00pm in 200 Cascade!

Trip Photos! - (4/8/14)

Check out some more sweet spring break ‘14 trip photos courtesy of Mr. Simonson. Just in time to satisfy those Zion cravings, Thanks Noah!



Remember tomorrow we will be sharing our photos and video from break with club. Also bring pictures to Riley so we can post them!

Sweet photo!
Remember we have a few short trips planned this term. Think about where you would like to go!
mypubliclands:

Oregon Badlands Wilderness
The Oregon Badlands Wilderness was designated in 2009 and now has a total of 29,261 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Oregon and is managed by the BLM.
The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas – Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands. 
A variety of wildlife species inhabit the area including yellow-bellied marmots, bobcat, mule deer, elk, and antelope. The southern portion of the Badlands Wilderness includes crucial winter range for mule deer. Avian species include prairie falcons and golden eagles.
Additional information about the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, and all the other BLM Wilderness areas in Oregon/Washington, is available online at: http://on.doi.gov/1fcHoCu
Photo: My Public Lands Flickr/ BLM-Oregon

Sweet photo!

Remember we have a few short trips planned this term. Think about where you would like to go!

mypubliclands:

Oregon Badlands Wilderness

The Oregon Badlands Wilderness was designated in 2009 and now has a total of 29,261 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Oregon and is managed by the BLM.

The Oregon Badlands Wilderness holds a number of remarkable and exciting landforms and geologic features. Most of the area includes the rugged Badlands volcano, which has features of inflated lava. Windblown volcanic ash and eroded lava make up the sandy, light-colored soil that covers the low and flat places in these fields of lava. Dry River, active during each of several ice ages, marks the southeast boundary between two volcanic areas – Badlands volcano and the Horse Ridge volcanoes. Earth movements along the Brothers Fault Zone have faulted and sliced up the old Horse Ridge volcanoes, but not Badlands volcano. The Badlands formed in an unusual way. The flow that supplied lava to the Badlands apparently developed a hole in the roof of its main lava tube. This hole became the source of lava that built a shield volcano that we call the Badlands (technically, a rootless shield volcano). An irregularly-shaped pit crater at the top of the shield marks the site where lava flowed in all directions to create the Badlands. 

A variety of wildlife species inhabit the area including yellow-bellied marmots, bobcat, mule deer, elk, and antelope. The southern portion of the Badlands Wilderness includes crucial winter range for mule deer. Avian species include prairie falcons and golden eagles.

Additional information about the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, and all the other BLM Wilderness areas in Oregon/Washington, is available online at: http://on.doi.gov/1fcHoCu

Photo: My Public Lands Flickr/ BLM-Oregon

Happy Spring Term! - (3/31/14)

Happy first day of classes, everyone! The Spring Break trip to Zion was a blast, we are all still shaking Navajo Sandstone out of our boots.

We will be having our first meeting of spring term this Wednesday, April 2nd @ 6:00 pm

Spring Breakers: Bring photos to Riley ASAP if you would like them to be featured on the blog.

REMINDER: TIE DYE PARTY THIS WEDNESDAY - (3/12/14)

Our 2014 Geology Club Tee Shirts are in! We will not be having our typical meeting this week. Instead club members are invited to come to Riley and Starr’s house (1471 Villard St.) to tie dye our new club shirts.

You do not have to buy a shirt if you just want to help tie dye, the more the merrier! If you DO want to purchase a shirt be sure to bring money. The first shirt is $20 and each additional shirt is $15.

Supplies should be all set up by about 3pm so come by anytime Wednesday afternoon after 3 up to and during meeting time! Hope to see all of you guys there!

Need-to-Know:  Tie Dyeing Party, Wednesday 3pm-7pm, 1471 Villard St. NO CLUB MEETING.

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